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MURPHY RELEASES THIRD AND FINAL “MADNESS, INC.” REPORT, FOCUSES ON HOW COLLEGES AND NCAA NEGLECT ATHLETES’ HEALTH

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WASHINGTON—U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-Conn.), a member of the U.S. Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee, on Monday released his third and final report in a series that considers the range of problems within college athletics. The report, “Madness, Inc.: How College Sports Leave Athletes Broken and Abandoned,” examines the ways in which colleges and the NCAA neglect athletes’ health.

College sports rely on athletes to entertain and captivate us with their talent—putting their bodies on the line in the process. It’s only fair that in turn, we prioritize their health. But this report found the opposite,” said Murphy. “Too many athletes leave college sports with far less than they started. This is a result of coaches and trainers pushing athletes beyond their limits, putting their health at risk just to win a game, and ignoring what’s good for their long-term health. It’s time we fix this broken system, and I’m working on federal, bipartisan legislation to do just that.”

This is the third and final report in Murphy’s Madness, Inc. series that considered a range of problems within college sports. Murphy’s first report, released in March during the annual men’s basketball “March Madness” tournament, examined the billions in revenues produced by college sports and how that money enriches nearly everyone but the athletes themselves. Coaches, former athletes, and advocates have spoken out in support of Murphy’s first report. Murphy’s second report examined the ways in which colleges fail in providing athletes the education they deserve. This report similarly received praise from coaches, former athletes and advocates.

Click here to download Madness, Inc. 

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